Sorg: Immigrants want government to ‘give you stuff’

After Latinos overwhelming voted for Pres. Obama, Republicans are bowing to political reality and embracing immigration reform.

Former state Rep. Gregory Sorg (R-Easton) didn’t get the memo. On NHPR’s The Exchange, he told host Brady Carlson that he is skeptical of achieving immigration reform under “a President who has said that the function of government is to make people’s lives better:”

If they come here with the idea in their head that they’re coming here to join a country and to become eventual voters under a system that is premised on the idea that the function of government is to give you stuff, then we’re headed for very bad trouble in this nation.

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  • susanthe

    Why was Sorg, a former legislator, on The Exchange opining about anything?

    The Exchange goes awfully far out of their way to talk to anyone but non-Republicans.

    • frant

      I’ve been very disappointed in Laura’s choice of guests lately. Greg Sorg? Why not someone who actually knows something about immigration? I hope we don’t hear the same thing when she talks about gun control. Get rid of the old guest list! We need new blood! Otherwise I, and many others, are going to find something else to listen to.

  • susanthe

    That was intended to read: The Exchange goes awfully far out of their way to avoid talking to ANY non-Republicans.

    Apparently they’ve tired of interviewing the same southern tier Republicans they’ve been regularly speaking to for the last decade, so they’re expanding into the northern reaches of the state in their quest for different Republican voices. That’s diversity, man.

    • mevansnh

      I’ve found the Exchange to be far from balanced and fair over the last couple of years. The baggers get lots of air time it seems. I was especially unhappy with an interview Laura had with Annie Kuster. She was rude, I thought, and curt with Annie. I actually canceled my membership at the time because of it.

      • hannah

        Talk show hosts and the Cons have a natural affinity for each other. They rely on the gift of gab to get them what they want, which is mainly to order other people around.
        That people expect them to deliver is not welcome information because they don’t know how.
        I also think the segmented format of American programming to accommodate commercial breaks has an influence. Each segment is scripted, even on public radio, in the sense that the host has prepared questions and follow ups. If the guest doesn’t provide the expected answers, it’s annoying.
        If one watches Al Jazeera, it’s obvious that the more generous format (they only have ads on the half hour) lets them accommodate a variety of discussion styles.

  • Rep. Jim Splaine

    The ignorance of that comment, let alone the racism inferred, is disgusting. He has no knowledge or perspective of American history, which tells us that our nation has become strong because of immigration, not in spite of it.

    I’ve given up hoping that the right-wingers and Tea Partiers want to be better informed or educated. I’m just fearful that because of the budget cuts forced by the conservative know-nothings that our youth are not receiving the education they need and deserve. The Tea Partiers and right-wingers know that their hope to avoid extinction is to keep the next generation of Americans as uneducated as they are.

    • hannah

      Some dumb cannot be educated away. This fellow seems proof.

  • susanthe

    Remember – Sorg’s the same guy that didn’t want NH to get any fuel assistance money from the feds:
    “The people of New Hampshire must be held competent to understand that every November, without fail, it gets cold at this latitude and that they must arrange their affairs so as to provide for this fact of life as a matter of personal responsibility.”

    The lack of basic human decency inherent in that statement should disqualify him from ever holding office again.

    • Rep. Jim Splaine

      Yes susanthe — and he was one of the many legislators who were 18th Century in their views of gay and lesbian equality. Really living on another planet.

      • BobRobertson

        Those who want to control other people’s lives give their entire groups bad reputations. The “Tea Party” got usurped into the mainstream Republicans so quickly, and their rhetoric changed to match.

        It’s too bad that the control freaks use the words of freedom. “My god says this is bad, so let’s make it illegal” is a terrible rationalization that can be used to make most anything illegal.

        And that’s hardly freedom.

        • hannah

          Perhaps that’s our unique contribution to the history of jurisprudence–how to neutralize immoral behavior by just making it legal. After all, the Constitution had no difficulty considering some humans as having no rights at all.
          I think that’s what makes the Cons anxious. If animals have rights, can humans be far behind?

  • susanthe

    The Tea Party wasn’t a grassroots upshoot, it was created and fed by the Koch Bros/GOP/Foxaganda. It was a merging of the far right with the lowest common denominators – a noise machine that got far more media attention than it ever merited.

    You’re right about control freaks using the words of “freedom.” The control freaks of the far right (and others pretending not to be affiliated with the far right) have usurped the words freedom and liberty. The only good thing about it, is that now when I see those words used by any group, I know that they are code words, used by people and groups who have ideologies incompatible with my beliefs.

  • Herb

    Most everyone I talk to about people who are here illegally automatically think of Hispanics who have come across the southern border to find work. There are others here too. My family has been here since the late 1600’s and my wife’s since the late 1800’s. But my wife’s cousin has been here for 12 years illegally. It seems my wife’s uncle spent some time in the Philippines during the Vietnam War and managed to leave behind a daughter that he says he wasn’t aware of. Our allies in the Vietnam War and the Korean War automatically consider children born to their servicemen as citizens of their respective countries. We’re the only country that doesn’t. My wife’s cousin (call her Anne) came here looking for her father at the age of 40. He had given her mother a false name but she was able to track down his relatives to upper state NY. Anne showed up at another uncle’s house in 2001. She was told her father and his wife live in Virginia. Unfortunately his wife did not take kindly to her because she was afraid her son’s would have to share their inheritance with her. Anne’s been hiding out with my wife’s relatives in NY since. She had a miserable life in the Philippines because she was a ‘half breed’. Our laws covering overseas children of servicemen only allow them to eventually become citizens if the father knew of their existence from the get-go leaving her in limbo. We’ve been told the laws putting these roadblocks in place are to “protect” servicemen and to keep unwanted third world riffrff from entering the country. To me the only “protection” is protecting the serviceman from his responsibilities. There are many people like Anne here for hundreds of different reasons. It’s not only people who have come here to find work.

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