Hillary 2016?

Yes it is WAY TOO EARLY for such a post. But… the mythical ‘Some’ are calling this the first campaign video of 2016.

What do you think Blue Hampshire would you like to See Hillary give it a go?

I’m probably in the Hillary Curious camp at this point…

Any other names you are hoping to start seeing around these parts?

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  • Rep. Jim Splaine

    Mike, it’s NOT too early!  Not to scare anyone, the N.H. First-In-The-Nation Presidential Primary (protected by our state law so we WILL be first, so other states:  back off) will be no later than January, 2016.  That’s less than 37 months from now, or about 160 weeks.  Or about 5 months of Tuesdays.

    So to be very serious for a moment, yes — Hillary Clinton should run.  I supported her in 2008’s primary, though I’ve been very pleased with Barack Obama.  

    She’ll still be young (the older I get, the more I realize that “age” is relative) and she’s even wiser than the first time I met her in 1991 when I told her SHE should be running for President, but that her husband was a close runner-up.

    She would be great.  And she’d continue the Democratic traditions of Bill Clinton and Barack Obama:  caring about people at home, and being friends with people abroad.  We need her.  

  • tchair
    • Douglas E. Lindner

      I was for Richardson and then Obama in the 2008 primaries. I think Hillary Cinton would be a better candidate in 2015-16 than she was in 2007-08, and I personally would be more open to it than I was.

      Is it too early? Sure. But Republicans are always better at cultivating their farm team. Hillary isn’t the only Democrat who could carry the torch in four years, but I think she’d do it very well.  

  • Jack Mitchell

    Political prognostication is a sketchy business. Even the folks with the inside track are apt to hedge their bets. In part, because the “principals” are very coy, vigilant to keep their competition and enemies guessing.

    For those of us on the fringe, we have only the crumb trail:

    DWS, if you cut her, bleeds Hillary.

    The news that the White House plans to renominate Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz to a second term in January ends a period of speculation that the Florida House member might be on her way out of the gig in President Obama’s second term.

    And, this odd bit of internet memery, which seredipitously planted a hipness of Hillary in the hungry young minds of the DC ‘staffer class.’

    More locally, though NH’s 2 Reps are closely aligned to Obama, it did not go unnoticed that Obama’s NH team did not move aggressively to assert itself in grabbing up positions as “super delegates.”

    Think of who has the juice in NH. How many of them endorsed Hillary in 2007?

    All that said, I, with all my political fiber, support Hillary2016. Without equivocation. In 2007, I knew Obama was a better choice for the time. I saw Clinton as too moderate and pro-corporation. However, with the onset of the “Great Recession,” the leadership style required to recover, actually forced Obama to govern as I had projected Hillary would have without the impetus.

    With Obama’s second term, certain domestic shifts will be made, ones that Hillary can build upon. Moreover, much of America’s security, on a variety of fronts, resides abroad. Hillary’s tenure as SOS has uniquely qualified her for a ‘post-Obama’ presidency.  

    • susaninrindge

      Your words are beyond jibberish!

      • Jack Mitchell
        • xteeth

          It’s more like UVW with just a touch of SPB!

    • Ray Buckley

      More locally, though NH’s 2 Reps are closely aligned to Obama, it did not go unnoticed that Obama’s NH team did not move aggressively to assert itself in grabbing up positions as “super delegates.”

      Think of who has the juice in NH. How many of them endorsed Hillary in 2007?

      NH has nine “superdelegates”

      Buckley – Neutral in primary, endorsed Obama in Spring 2008
      Fuller Clark – Obama State CoChair
      Sullivan – Hillary State CoChair
      Burling – Edwards, endorsed Obama in Spring 2008
      Dowdell – Obama 08 Delegate
      Hassan – Hillary
      Shaheen – Neutral in primary
      Shea-Porter – Obama National CoChair
      Kuster – Women for Obama State Chair

      Two out of nine supported Hillary in 07.
      Four supported Obama in 07.
      Two more supported Obama by June 08 Super Tuesday.

      • Jack Mitchell
        • Ray Buckley

          …are talking gibberish then try to change the subject.

          • Jack Mitchell
      • Douglas E. Lindner

        (kidding)

    • gradysdad

      I never thought I would live to see the day.  You may come to regret those words, Jack!

      Go Hillary 2016

      • Jack Mitchell

        Didn’t we tussle, mostly, over the health care mandate?

        Can we call it a draw?

        • gradysdad

          Hey, we all came together and got Obama elected twice. I would say it all came out pretty well in the end.

          • Jack Mitchell

            Was it over when the Germans bombed Pearl Harbor?

            All kidding aside, imho, Hillary has to be POTUS in 2017. This would close the loop. Plus, America would be a much better place for it, too.

            So, until we actually get TO the end, we can’t “say it all came out pretty well.”  

  • JonnyBBad
  • Kathy Sullivan 2

    The President hasn’t even been sworn in for his second term and already people are moving onto the next election.

    I agree with Gail Collins of the NY Times who pointed out that SoS Clinton basically freezes the field for the next year or so while she decides what to do, and for that we should all thank her.

    • cblodg

      As much as some (myself included) don’t want to admit, I’d be willing to bet Joe Biden will attempt to make a run, and he’s really the one that freezes the field.  He couldn’t win though.  In recent polls, Hillary polls at the top of every single one of potential Democratic runners (things change of course).  Not to mention she has a, I believe, 60+% approval rating.

      If Biden chooses to run I feel he’ll hurt the chances of keeping the White House.  Not to mention, would Hillary primary a sitting VP?  I doubt it.  Not to mention it would place President Obama in a terrible position if she did run.  Given the choice between Biden and Clinton, I’m with Clinton.

      • Kathy Sullivan 2

        I don’t see Biden freezing the field. The last time a sitting Democratic vp ran, he had competition (Bradley v. Gore). And Walter Mondale, who had been vp four years earlier, had a lot of competition. Hubert Humphrey had competition.

        Which is not to say the Secretary of State will not have competition if she chooses to run.  

  • FrankLloydMike

    before we start talking about the next campaign.

    It’s fun–and important–to think about who might run, and to cultivate a strong field of candidates. But there is far too much focus in this country–thanks in large part to media obsession, the need for constant fundraising, and so on–on campaigning. And it seems like we are moving more and more toward continuous campaigns.

    At least on here, I’d like to hear about we hope to accomplish in the next two and four years of governing before we start talking about who may be running for president in four years.

  • susaninrindge


    Can’t help lovin’ that candidate of mine.

    Now, tell me (s)he’s lazy, tell me (s)he’s slow,
    Tell me I’m crazy, maybe I know,
    Can’t help lovin’ that candidate of mine!

    That day (s)he goes away
    Is a rainy day,
    But when (s)he comes back,
    That day is fine
    And the sun will shine!

    Can’t help lovin’ that candidate of mine.

  • susanthe

    on the subject of Hillary and what a Hillary run will look like:

    What you’re going to see when and if Clinton announces is Whitewater-plus-Benghazi, all run through the massive post-Citizens United pukefunnels, and what a lot of fun that’s going to be.

    • Jack Mitchell

      Of course, we should let Rush Limbaugh decide what we do. That just makes perfect sense!

      • susanthe

        coming from the party of timid adherence to a GOP pledge.

    • Jack Mitchell

      Let’s start by stating the obvious: Hillary Rodham Clinton would be a formidable presidential candidate in 2016.

      Mrs. Clinton’s credentials as secretary of state, as a United States senator and as a politically engaged first lady would be hard for any of her Democratic or Republican rivals to match. She would have little trouble raising funds or garnering support from the Democratic officials, and she might even come close to clearing the Democratic field of serious opposition.

      Mrs. Clinton made some tactical errors during the 2008 campaign – particularly, in her staff’s failure to understand the importance of contesting caucus states. But she improved considerably as a candidate over the course of the long primary, and the experience she gained would undoubtedly help her if she were to run again.

      But if Mrs. Clinton runs for president in 2016, one thing is almost certain: she won’t be as popular as she is right now.
      -snip

      Perhaps Mrs. Clinton’s most impressive attribute is her ability to withstand criticism – and often emerge the stronger from it. If she runs for president again, she will surely receive plenty of it.

      • xteeth

        the GOP just wouldn’t be able to compete, in his view.

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